October 12th - Three Humpbacks in the Strait of Georgia!

What a thrill to find three humpback whales in the Strait of Georgia! In autumn our humpback whale sightings typically increase as these incredible giants begin their migration south toward their winter breeding waters in tropical seas.

After having a close look at our photographs from the tour, we were able to identify these three whales as BCX1057 “Divot”, who is a breeding female travelling with her calf “Olympus”, and KEX0025 “Slide”.

“Divot” and her calf “Olympus” are spending their final weeks together before they will travel separately for rest of their lives. Mother and calf pairs only make a single migration together, so calves have just one chance to learn the route before they’re on their own the following year. We hope to see these whales again before they continue their southward migration.

Here are the photo highlights from the tour, enjoy!

 "Divot" and her calf "Olympus" heading to the depths! Photo by Alanna Vivani

"Divot" and her calf "Olympus" heading to the depths! Photo by Alanna Vivani

 Here’s KEX0025 “Slide” taking a deep dive. Photo by Alanna Vivani

Here’s KEX0025 “Slide” taking a deep dive. Photo by Alanna Vivani

 “Divot” gets her name from the little dip on the right side of her fluke! Photo by Alanna Vivani

“Divot” gets her name from the little dip on the right side of her fluke! Photo by Alanna Vivani

 Fluke-waterfall! Photo by Val Watson

Fluke-waterfall! Photo by Val Watson

 Thar she blows! A humpback’s blow can reach up to 15ft in the air, and this is often how we find them. Photo by Val Watson

Thar she blows! A humpback’s blow can reach up to 15ft in the air, and this is often how we find them. Photo by Val Watson






Jilann LechnerComment