October 4th - 4 Humpbacks in the Strait of Georgia!

Cascadia set off the dock at 11am and searched high and low for signs of blows and dorsals. It wasn’t until early afternoon that the radio echoed “Contact with HBs!” and our boat headed toward the scene.

One humpback was encountered milling in the Strait in great conditions and our crew were able to get some photos of the fluke.

Soon after this whale was found, another vessel found even more humpbacks! Cascadia went to visit this group of three whales and were able to identify two of them as Heather/Quattro and Raptor.

FOUR humpback whales total, not too shabby of a day! Not too shabby at all…

Here are some of the best photos taken by the crew that day.

 Fluke shots like these taken by our naturalists help local NGOs monitor this growing population. www.ketacoastalconservation.org. Photo by Rodrigo Menezes

Fluke shots like these taken by our naturalists help local NGOs monitor this growing population. www.ketacoastalconservation.org. Photo by Rodrigo Menezes

 Dorsal fins also help us to identify whales, but it can be much more tricky! Photo by Rodrigo Menezes

Dorsal fins also help us to identify whales, but it can be much more tricky! Photo by Rodrigo Menezes

 Two whales is better than one! Photo by Rodrigo Menezes

Two whales is better than one! Photo by Rodrigo Menezes

 Whale waterfalls are our favourite waterfalls. Photo by Rodrigo Menezes

Whale waterfalls are our favourite waterfalls. Photo by Rodrigo Menezes

 Photo by Rodrigo Menezes

Photo by Rodrigo Menezes

 Fluke of Heather/Quattro. Photo by Rodrigo Menezes

Fluke of Heather/Quattro. Photo by Rodrigo Menezes

 Photo by Rodrigo Menezes

Photo by Rodrigo Menezes

 Photo by Rodrigo Menezes

Photo by Rodrigo Menezes

 Perfect conditions for spotting spouts! Photo by Rodrigo Menezes

Perfect conditions for spotting spouts! Photo by Rodrigo Menezes

Jilann LechnerComment