June 25th - T49A's and T65A's at the bottom of the Strait of Georgia

We set out into the Strait of Georgia to see what the T49As and T65As were up to. And the seas were just choppy enough for a fun ride down!

The Strait of Georgia is the largest body of water we cross during our tours, and it's full of life! Its waters reach a maximum depth of almost 550 meters (1500 ft)! BC's longest river, the Fraser, deposits nutrient-rich waters into the strait year-round, giving rise to an abundance and diversity of marine life, including harbour and Dall's porpoises, Steller and California sea lions, harbour seals, bald eagles, five species of Pacific salmon, humpback whales, and of course orcas!

We travelled all the way to the Southern end of the Strait of Georgia to see the two pods of transient (Bigg's orca), and it was wonderful to witness these families spending time together in their wild home.

 Here's T65A2, a 14 year old male, catching some waves and sunshine while surfacing. Photo by Val Watson

Here's T65A2, a 14 year old male, catching some waves and sunshine while surfacing. Photo by Val Watson

 Catching a breath in the bright blue seas! Photo by Val Watson

Catching a breath in the bright blue seas! Photo by Val Watson

 An eyepatch peeping just above the surface. Photo by Alanna Vivani

An eyepatch peeping just above the surface. Photo by Alanna Vivani

These transient (Bigg's) orcas spend all year in our waters. Their main food source, harbour seals and sea lions are in huge abundance so they've got lots to eat! Join us on our next daily tour to spend some time with these beauties! 

 

 

 

Jilann LechnerComment