June 7th - A time with T100's

On Thursday, after watching some noisy California Sea Lions near to Gabriola Island, we crossed by Dodds Narrow on Cascadia and headed south in our search to find the Transients Orcas. At the beginning of the tour the sea was a little rough, and our guests had a lot of fun while Cascadia was passing trough the waves on Stuart Channel.

California Sea Lion. Photo by Rodrigo Menezes

California Sea Lion. Photo by Alanna Vivani

 Our guests enjoying the time with the California Sea Lions. Photo by Rodrigo Menezes

Our guests enjoying the time with the California Sea Lions. Photo by Rodrigo Menezes

When we reached Trincomali Channel the sea was much calmer so we could focus on our search for the whales, and were very lucky to be able to see a small Harbour Porpoise.  With a dark gray back and light gray underside, harbour porpoises are easily mistaken for dolphins. However, at only 4.6-6.2ft in length and weighing 134 – 168 lbs, they are much smaller than dolphins and most other porpoises. They are known to be very shy but It is common to view them feeding in upwell areas, where the currents mix together and attract various small fish.

And not far from there we finally found the T100's pod! This pod is composed by their matriarch T100 a female born in 1978 and her three calfs (T100C born in 2002, T100E from 2009 and T100F born in 2015)

 The T100's pod. Photo by Alanna Vivani

The T100's pod. Photo by Alanna Vivani

 T100C, T100E and T100F travelling close to Moresby Island. Photo by Rodrigo Menezes

T100C, T100E and T100F travelling close to Moresby Island. Photo by Rodrigo Menezes

 T100C is also known as "Laurel". Photo by Rodrigo Menezes

T100C is also known as "Laurel". Photo by Rodrigo Menezes

 A closer look on T100F who is only three years old. Photo by Alanna Vivani

A closer look on T100F who is only three years old. Photo by Alanna Vivani

It was another great day on the water. Come with us on our next adventure and prepare to be amazed! 

Jilann LechnerComment