June 30th - T65A Family with Baby!

We were lucky enough to find the T65A transient (Bigg's) family just 30 minutes from our Nanaimo dock! 

 Transient (Bigg's) surfacing near some exposed rocks in the Salish Sea. Photo by Alanna Vivani

Transient (Bigg's) surfacing near some exposed rocks in the Salish Sea. Photo by Alanna Vivani

The T65A pod is a very successful group of whales. The Matriarch,  38 year-old T65A just had her SIXTH calf this year! This youngster (T65A6) is currently the youngest known whale in BC's transient (Bigg's) orca population.

 Newborn T65A6 shoots past the surface for some air! Photo by Val Watson

Newborn T65A6 shoots past the surface for some air! Photo by Val Watson

Orca calfs' white markings appear orange, which is completely normal. Their blubber (the layer of insulating fat surrounding their body) is still very thin during their first years, so you can actually see their muscles beneath this layer until they are several years old.

It's fun to watch young orcas come up to the surface for air. While adults take in air gracefully as they reach the surface, calves always seem to pop up a little more clumsily, as if they're not exactly sure where their blowhole is!

 T65A2 is the oldest male in his family and travels with his mother and four younger siblings. Photo by Alanna Vivani

T65A2 is the oldest male in his family and travels with his mother and four younger siblings. Photo by Alanna Vivani

After leaving the T65A family, we stopped for some seals and sea lions, and witnessed a sleek group of cormorants preening on an exposed rock.

 Cormorants preening. Photo by Alanna Vivani

Cormorants preening. Photo by Alanna Vivani

There's tons of wildlife to see out here on our wild coast, and every day is unique! Join us to see whales, seals, sea lions, porpoises, birds, and more! Book online or call us at 250-667-5177. Looking forward to having you aboard!

 

 

 

Jilann LechnerComment