August 24th- Killer whales on both sides of the Straight!

Today, after weeks of smoky, hazy weather, it was a day full of clear blue skies. We could even see all the way across the straight of Georgia, to the mainland and Sunshine coast! This morning we decided to go this direction, and into Howe sound, where we found 4 orca!

 "Laurel", also known as T100C, surfacing near Pasley Island. He is very identifiable by that divot on the back of his dorsal fin. Photo by Alanna Vivani. 

"Laurel", also known as T100C, surfacing near Pasley Island. He is very identifiable by that divot on the back of his dorsal fin. Photo by Alanna Vivani. 

 A female and male surfacing for air in unison. Photo by Alanna Vivani. 

A female and male surfacing for air in unison. Photo by Alanna Vivani. 

 The male takes the lead! Photo by Alanna Vivani. 

The male takes the lead! Photo by Alanna Vivani. 

On our way back from our time with these 4, the T100s, we stopped by Snake Island to see the harbour porpoises. 

 Harbour seals posing for their photo op! Photo by Alanna Vivani. 

Harbour seals posing for their photo op! Photo by Alanna Vivani. 

In the afternoon, we changed our route, and went south, through Dodd narrows, and continued this direction until we entered the straight through Active pass, which is located between Galiano Island and Mayne Island. When we came upon theT101 and T102 killer whales we could see that they were having a snack. You know what this means! After chow time, it was time to CELEBRATE!

 An orca bursting out of the water for a half-breach! Photo by Jenna Keen. 

An orca bursting out of the water for a half-breach! Photo by Jenna Keen. 

 Photo by Jenna Keen. 

Photo by Jenna Keen. 

 Photo by Jenna Keen. 

Photo by Jenna Keen. 

 A curious killer whale casually surfacing with a spy hop! Photo by Jenna Keen. 

A curious killer whale casually surfacing with a spy hop! Photo by Jenna Keen. 

After a quick celebration, it was back to business, so they began to travel north. As they continued North, the two sons began separating from their mother and the lone male, T102, who is potentially her first born son. 

 Photo by Jenna Keen. 

Photo by Jenna Keen. 

 Two brothers traveling North. Photo by Alanna Vivani. 

Two brothers traveling North. Photo by Alanna Vivani. 

  Photo by Alanna Vivani. 

 Photo by Alanna Vivani. 

 Photo by Alanna Vivani. 

Photo by Alanna Vivani. 

On the way back to the harbour, one of our boats, Cascadia, spotted a humpback! Identified as "Scratchy," we think this is the first time this whale has been spotted this season!

 "Scratchy" the humpback preparing to take a deep dive. Photo by Alanna Vivanni. 

"Scratchy" the humpback preparing to take a deep dive. Photo by Alanna Vivanni. 

 Photo by Alanna Vivanni. 

Photo by Alanna Vivanni. 

Continuing on our way to the harbour we stopped by a buoy loaded with sleeping stellar sea lions. Some of these animals had just been swimming, which is why they look dark and glossy. How many sea lions can you spot?

 Sea lions... not ones for personal space. Photo by Alanna Vivani. 

Sea lions... not ones for personal space. Photo by Alanna Vivani. 

Jilann Lechner3 Comments